There are two kinds of people. Those who adore cats and those who think that cats are aloof and untrainable. Non-cat people might better relate to cats if they realized how similar we truly are.

Cats enjoy companionship and benefit from social interaction as much as we do. They can be affectionate, but like us, some prefer a gentle touch instead of a vigorous hug.

A stimulating environment reduces stress-related health decline. We read books or watch TV; they like to stare out the window or chase things.

Cats and humans take comfort in familiarity. A new cat, puppy or baby in the house or a move to a new house can stress cats out. Change can be good for us, but it’s still a scary. Just ask a cat.

We like to play and so do cats. Playtime releases neurotransmitters that make us feel good. Play benefits us physically, mentally and emotionally by relieving stress and burning calories. If cats could teach us one lesson it would be to play more.

Consequences play a big role in the way we learn. If behavior is rewarded it will likely be repeated. If your cat likes to jump on the countertops it is better to give them an alternative elevated surface such as a cat roost than merely pushing them off the counter.

Understand your world better by looking at it through the eyes of a cat.